Bullshit

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During last Sunday’s game, my roommate, a Broncos fan, asked me why the 49ers were moving on from Jim Harbaugh. I thought about his question for most of the game, and realized I didn’t have a good answer. There were reasons, to be sure, but none of them made any sense.

“There were philosophical differences.”

“Harbaugh and Trent Baalke butted heads.”

“Jim Harbaugh’s attitude was an issue.”

The reasons came readily, but I couldn’t say them. I wouldn’t. I wasn’t going to borrow the woefully insufficient language that the 49ers organization tossed to a ravenous and frustrated fanbase. No matter how insignificant the question, I wasn’t going to add to their bullshit.

2014 was a year of problems, and of blame. For the first (and last) time in the Harbaugh Era, the 49ers struggled. In truth, the problems started almost a year ago in Seattle, when Navorro Bowman saw his knee destroyed while recovering a Seahawks fumble in the fourth quarter of the NFC Championship. The problems kept on; the roster was worn down to a stump, but still managed to stay productive. Through all of this, there was talk about Harbaugh being difficult to work with, Harbaugh losing the locker room, and Harbaugh being too expensive for Jed York’s taste.

It was as if the ownership could not stomach anything less than total success. Despite the fact that Harbaugh was one of the surest bets in football, the team’s immediate failures outweighed a history filled with winning. Perhaps they bought into the perpetual myth that Harbaugh is only good at rebuilding programs. Perhaps the front office and ownership were convinced he was no longer necessary.

The only rational explanation is that Harbaugh was unwilling to shake up the offensive staff. Once again, I think ALL of the 2014 49ers’ problems start with injuries, but anyone that reads my blog or any other outlet that covers the 49ers knows that Greg Roman was a very unpopular offensive coach. Harbaugh could have refused to get rid of Roman, but this theory has no actual basis.

Until we know more, we have to go with the answer that makes the most ‘sense’, even if it isn’t sensical. After a year of problems, another one has cropped up: the 49ers aren’t a well-run organization. You can point to the drafts and the recent playoff berths, but I can just as easily point to the unpopular mess that is Levis Stadium, or York’s insistence on venting his frustrations on Twitter and elsewhere. Perhaps as a corporation interested in making the largest amount of money possible, the 49ers are succeeding. However, as an organization hoping to pay back a fanbase that remained mostly loyal through ten years of futility, York and the 49ers just made their debt much harder to repay.

For a million or so a year, the 49ers have transformed from a juggernaut to a league laughingstock. Some have contended that this is simply a short-sighted attempt to reap the benefits of a new stadium without the cost of a premium coach, but no matter what the case, it is clear that York, and perhaps Baalke, have goals distinct from those of the fans, and of the team.

If I were not a huge fan of Harbaugh, I might try to look at this more empirically. Even from a hyper-rational standpoint, this move makes little sense. Harbaugh was the fifth-winningest coach in NFL history, and there are no obvious replacements on the market. Harbaugh was simply too good, and the head coach market too lacking in viable options.

So there you have it. The 49ers have made a move that has no logical basis. They continually backed down from defending Harbaugh, and from acknowledging the actual circumstances of a lost season. York has shown the fans and the team that his ego and profit margins are vastly more important to him than winning, and that he considers his negligible football and business experience more estimable than Harbaugh’s actual, tangible, record-setting accomplishments.

I wish there were some positive to take away from this, but there isn’t. Maybe in a year I will look back on this post and laugh at my own lack of foresight, but from where I sit now, there is no one in the world of football capable of filling Harbaugh’s shoes.

49ers at Raiders: The Black Hole

San Francisco 49ers v Oakland Raiders

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The 49ers effectively ended their season on Sunday, failing in all three aspects of the game and struggling to look competent against one of the league’s worst teams. Anyone paying attention to this team saw this coming, just not necessarily against the Raiders. There isn’t much to say. The rest of the season has a new meaning. It’s on Jim Harbaugh to salvage what the 49ers have left and either prove his worth to Jed York or give his resume a little more oomph. Past that, the 49ers will be playing for pride and spite. The playoffs are still technically in reach, but after the last few weeks, I’m not going to torment myself with the idea of them playing in January.

The Good Thing

Bruce Ellington

Sunday’s sole bright spot was in the return game. The 2014 49ers have been horrible on special teams, consistently putting the offense in terrible position and sticking the defense in tricky spots. They are ranked 28th in the league, but, like every other position group, have had their share of injuries. Ellington was absolutely electric in college, and I was really excited when the 49ers drafted him. After years of placing my hopes in Kyle Williams and LaMichael James, it was nice to finally see the 49ers get SOMETHING together in the return game. Ellington was great on Sunday, averaging 30.7 yards per kickoff return and showing exactly why he will be a big factor in the 49ers’ long-term plans.

The Bad Things

Pass Rush

For the first time in a while, the pass rush failed to get anything done. Rookie quarterback Derek Carr was lauded throughout the game for his calm in the pocket, but it was the Raiders’ offensive line stonewalling Aaron Lynch, Aldon Smith and Justin Smith that allowed their offense to flow.

Gameplan

The 49ers averaged 5.3 yards per rush against the Raiders, but only rushed 18 times. For whatever reason, the coaching staff decided that this distinct advantage was not worth exploiting. This is a team that averages 28 rushing attempts per game, but on a day that Frank Gore was able to pick up chunks of yardage, did not rely on this obvious strength. I would love to say that this was an isolated incident, but this has strung the 49ers numerous times during Greg Roman’s reign, most notably against the Seahawks.

Colin Kaepernick

Kaep was the polar opposite of Carr: jerky, indecisive and utterly ineffective. He threw an ugly, useless interception on the first play and never got it together after that. He’s had ugly stretches before, but he’s also had a strong run game to rely on. In a season like this, where everything seems to be going wrong, Kaep has failed to rally the team consistently. He is one of the many reasons the 49ers will be missing the playoffs, but nobody can honestly cite him as the primary driver of the offense’s ineffectiveness. Whatever is going on with Kaep, I hope he is learning. No quarterback has a flawless career, but the truly good ones learn from their failures and never let the problems of the present drag them down and hinder their development.

Super Bowl L

49ersinjeansSuper Bowl L will be played at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara. It was the logical choice after a lot of Silicon Valley tech giants started to write checks, giving Jed York the cash he needed to qualify as a viable host. The week leading up to the Super Bowl will be filled with events all over the Bay Area, hopefully serving as a generator of revenue for the region.

This will be a big celebration, as it marks the 50th anniversary of the Super Bowl. It will showcase the Bay Area as well as the history of the Super Bowl, which hopefully means the week leading up to the game will be filled with more than endless, bleary-eyed rants about each team from exhausted analysts. While it will be a big event, the Bay is no stranger to celebrations of this size. The America’s Cup will take place in the Bay later this year and San Francisco also played host to two World Series in the last three years.

The most interesting factor will be the 49ers themselves. They are very well set up after this years draft to maintain their status as a Super Bowl contender for the next five or six years. They have built a strong foundation around Colin Kaepernick, and, barring a meltdown, should have a pretty good chance to be the first team to play the Super Bowl at their home stadium.